Never Miss a word!
Kids need Science
Kids Need Science is devoted to demystifying and explaining science, technology, engineering and math words, names, and concepts. Check back often for a science, technology, engineering or math word defined and explained every day.
featured-on-pbsparents-button
.
MAP OF VISITORS WORLDWIDE
Tip Jar. This blog is completely self-funded and is 100% original content. Consider a small donation to help buy dictionaries and images to use on this site. Thanks!
The element platinum was first identified independently in the 1740s by both Spanish scientist Antonio de Ulloa and English metallurgist Charles Wood from samples collected in Colombia.  The most important and abundant member of the platinum group metals, platinum has an atomic number of 78 and a face centered cubic crystal structure.  Platinum is favored for its extreme strength and resistance to corrosion or reaction with other elements and compounds making ideal for laboratory tools. The English word platinum (considered Modern Latin) derives from the Spanish word platina (courtesy de Ulloa) which was a diminutive of the Spanish word for silver, plata.  The word first existed in English as platina, when both English and Spanish scientists thought platinum was an inferior version of silver.  Platinum had an intermediate step in platinium around 1812, before dropping the I and entering English finally as platinum a short time later.  
Platinum has many important industrial uses courtesy of its high strength and resistance to heat and corrosion, with a notable use in car engines-the tops of spark plugs are covered in platinum and can often last the life of the vehicle.  While platinum has some uses in jewelry, its resemblance to silver often limits its appeal.  
Image of platinum crystals courtesy Periodictableru, used with permission under a Creative Commons 3.0 license.

The element platinum was first identified independently in the 1740s by both Spanish scientist Antonio de Ulloa and English metallurgist Charles Wood from samples collected in Colombia. The most important and abundant member of the platinum group metals, platinum has an atomic number of 78 and a face centered cubic crystal structure. Platinum is favored for its extreme strength and resistance to corrosion or reaction with other elements and compounds making ideal for laboratory tools. The English word platinum (considered Modern Latin) derives from the Spanish word platina (courtesy de Ulloa) which was a diminutive of the Spanish word for silver, plata. The word first existed in English as platina, when both English and Spanish scientists thought platinum was an inferior version of silver. Platinum had an intermediate step in platinium around 1812, before dropping the I and entering English finally as platinum a short time later.

Platinum has many important industrial uses courtesy of its high strength and resistance to heat and corrosion, with a notable use in car engines-the tops of spark plugs are covered in platinum and can often last the life of the vehicle. While platinum has some uses in jewelry, its resemblance to silver often limits its appeal.

Image of platinum crystals courtesy Periodictableru, used with permission under a Creative Commons 3.0 license.

  1. thisisironman reblogged this from kidsneedscience
  2. jameswigglesworth reblogged this from kidsneedscience
  3. vieri-de-bitch-face reblogged this from robot-scientist
  4. gayredshirts reblogged this from scienceing
  5. ittakesathief reblogged this from scienceing
  6. holadrim reblogged this from kidsneedscience
  7. nikoletti reblogged this from neuronsandneutrons
  8. abcstarstuff reblogged this from neuronsandneutrons
  9. queencameltoe reblogged this from coldsmog
  10. coldsmog reblogged this from scienceing
  11. librarian-of-time-and-space reblogged this from neuronsandneutrons
  12. sethvandorken reblogged this from sirdeimos
  13. sirdeimos reblogged this from neuronsandneutrons
  14. shady-bear reblogged this from neuronsandneutrons
  15. science-in-a-jar reblogged this from neuronsandneutrons
  16. theblackpsychiatrist reblogged this from biognosis
  17. bostoncremepietho reblogged this from scienceing
  18. bioloxia reblogged this from neuronsandneutrons
  19. runespoor reblogged this from scienceing
  20. scienceing reblogged this from robot-scientist
  21. robot-scientist reblogged this from neuronsandneutrons
  22. crumblybutgood reblogged this from neuronsandneutrons
  23. neuronsandneutrons reblogged this from biognosis
  24. biognosis reblogged this from kidsneedscience
  25. omar-en-la-cochera reblogged this from kidsneedscience
  26. guizmoe69 reblogged this from kidsneedscience
  27. tianatomas11 said: Wow
  28. limitlesscorrosion reblogged this from kidsneedscience
  29. black-raindrops reblogged this from kidsneedscience
  30. hungarianasian reblogged this from kidsneedscience