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Thirty nine years ago today one of the most famous images of the planet earth was taken by either Harrison Schmitt or Ron Evans of the Apollo 17 crew.  It was a photo that would define an era and give a new appreciation world wide for both the space program and the small connected orb humans live on.  The etymology of the word earth is complex, so I wil quote directly from www.etymonline.com:
Old English eorþe ground, soil, dry land, also used (along with middangeard) for the (material) world (as opposed to the heavens or the underworld), from Proto Germanic *ertho (cf. O.Fris. erthe “earth,” O.S. ertha, O.N. jörð, M.Du. eerde, Du. aarde, O.H.G. erda, Ger. Erde, Goth. airþa), from PIE base *er- “earth, ground” (cf. M.Ir. -ert “earth”). The earth considered as a planet was so called from c.1400.

Original Caption:  “View of the Earth as seen by the Apollo 17 crew traveling toward the moon. This translunar coast photograph extends from the Mediterranean Sea area to the Antarctica south polar ice cap. This is the first time the Apollo trajectory made it possible to photograph the south polar ice cap. Note the heavy cloud cover in the Southern Hemisphere. Almost the entire coastline of Africa is clearly visible. The Arabian Peninsula can be seen at the northeastern edge of Africa. The large island off the coast of Africa is Madagascar. The Asian mainland is on the horizon toward the northeast.”
Photo courtesy NASA, in the public domain.  Photo taken by either Harrison Schmitt or Ron Evans (of the Apollo 17 crew).  Original caption courtesy NASA via Wikipedia.

Thirty nine years ago today one of the most famous images of the planet earth was taken by either Harrison Schmitt or Ron Evans of the Apollo 17 crew. It was a photo that would define an era and give a new appreciation world wide for both the space program and the small connected orb humans live on. The etymology of the word earth is complex, so I wil quote directly from www.etymonline.com:

Old English eorþe ground, soil, dry land, also used (along with middangeard) for the (material) world (as opposed to the heavens or the underworld), from Proto Germanic *ertho (cf. O.Fris. erthe “earth,” O.S. ertha, O.N. jörð, M.Du. eerde, Du. aarde, O.H.G. erda, Ger. Erde, Goth. airþa), from PIE base *er- “earth, ground” (cf. M.Ir. -ert “earth”). The earth considered as a planet was so called from c.1400.

Original Caption: “View of the Earth as seen by the Apollo 17 crew traveling toward the moon. This translunar coast photograph extends from the Mediterranean Sea area to the Antarctica south polar ice cap. This is the first time the Apollo trajectory made it possible to photograph the south polar ice cap. Note the heavy cloud cover in the Southern Hemisphere. Almost the entire coastline of Africa is clearly visible. The Arabian Peninsula can be seen at the northeastern edge of Africa. The large island off the coast of Africa is Madagascar. The Asian mainland is on the horizon toward the northeast.”

Photo courtesy NASA, in the public domain. Photo taken by either Harrison Schmitt or Ron Evans (of the Apollo 17 crew). Original caption courtesy NASA via Wikipedia.

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