Never Miss a word!
Kids need Science
Kids Need Science is devoted to demystifying and explaining science, technology, engineering and math words, names, and concepts. Check back often for a science, technology, engineering or math word defined and explained every day.
featured-on-pbsparents-button
.
MAP OF VISITORS WORLDWIDE
Tip Jar. This blog is completely self-funded and is 100% original content. Consider a small donation to help buy dictionaries and images to use on this site. Thanks!
Almost immediately after the establishment of both the Fahrenheit and Celsius scales, science outgrew the two scales.  Application of Robert Boyle’s Gas Laws (published 1662) led to the studies of Guillaume Amontons who predicted the existence of an ‘absolute’ temperature in 1702.  It wasn’t until 1848 that William Thompson, the 1st Baron Kelvin put forth a scale to denote it.  Kelvin is interesting as a scientific designation because as an eponym it refers not to William Thompson by name but rather to his Barony.  Lord Kelvin was a scientist, engineer, politician and in general a distinguished polymath awarded a knightship and elevated to the House of Lords for his contributions to science and engineering.
The Kelvin thermodynamic temperature scale is based on the temperature at which all movement and activity cease-the lowest possible thermal energy state of matter, currently defined as 1/273.16 of the thermodynamic temperature of the triple point of water, which is 0.01 degrees Celsius or 32.02 degrees Fahrenheit. 
In addition to his work with thermodynamics and the absolute zero temperature scale, Lord Kelvin was a busy and dedicated professor, scientist and engineer.  He took part in the expedition to lay the Trans-Atlantic cable and when the cable snapped he wrote a paper on the stresses on the cable with suggestions for the next attempt.  He then accompanied several additional cable laying expeditions and assisted in the engineering challenges as well as calculations on data rate and the cable’s technical capabilities.  He contributed greatly to the refinement of the marine compass.
Photo of William Thompson, 1st Baron Kelvin from the Smithsonian Collection, image in the public domain. 

Almost immediately after the establishment of both the Fahrenheit and Celsius scales, science outgrew the two scales.  Application of Robert Boyle’s Gas Laws (published 1662) led to the studies of Guillaume Amontons who predicted the existence of an ‘absolute’ temperature in 1702.  It wasn’t until 1848 that William Thompson, the 1st Baron Kelvin put forth a scale to denote it.  Kelvin is interesting as a scientific designation because as an eponym it refers not to William Thompson by name but rather to his Barony.  Lord Kelvin was a scientist, engineer, politician and in general a distinguished polymath awarded a knightship and elevated to the House of Lords for his contributions to science and engineering.

The Kelvin thermodynamic temperature scale is based on the temperature at which all movement and activity cease-the lowest possible thermal energy state of matter, currently defined as 1/273.16 of the thermodynamic temperature of the triple point of water, which is 0.01 degrees Celsius or 32.02 degrees Fahrenheit. 

In addition to his work with thermodynamics and the absolute zero temperature scale, Lord Kelvin was a busy and dedicated professor, scientist and engineer.  He took part in the expedition to lay the Trans-Atlantic cable and when the cable snapped he wrote a paper on the stresses on the cable with suggestions for the next attempt.  He then accompanied several additional cable laying expeditions and assisted in the engineering challenges as well as calculations on data rate and the cable’s technical capabilities.  He contributed greatly to the refinement of the marine compass.

Photo of William Thompson, 1st Baron Kelvin from the Smithsonian Collection, image in the public domain. 

  1. kidsneedscience posted this